MARCH ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES

Bourdon Building, 4 students

The Master of Architectural Studies is research and project driven providing multi-disciplinary input through a series of specialist pathways which include Urban Building, Urban Design, Creative Urban Practices, Digital Creativity, Energy and Environment, Zero Energy, Mass Customised Housing and History and Theory of the City.

The programme begins with a series of core lectures and seminars, balanced by focused reading of key literature related to the six specialist areas of enquiry. This enables all students to gain a multi-disciplinary perspective and provides a context for shared discourse.

Students are encouraged to work within the City of Glasgow and its environs, as these offer an ideal laboratory for studying architectural and urban design. The city is a living resource, bearing the characteristic morphological imprints it shares with its European counterparts but also those of the ubiquitous gridiron planned cities of North and South America. The varied legacies of the city’s medieval origins, 18th century extensions, dramatic 19th century expansion and post war decline together with the initiatives taken to secure its present recovery have all endowed the city with a wealth of not only source material for investigative study, but also in the diverse range of circumstances it offers for speculation on the future city.

The Individual Research Project is a culmination of 3 semesters work where students develop an architectural response to a self defined research question. Each body of work evidences the gathering, organisation, analysis, synthesis and deployment of data, research and theory, thus generating an original intellectual position, and a creative, responsive architectural proposal.

Students are expected to operate with professionalism, independence and self-direction in preparation for the start of their architectural career.

In 2022-23 the Masters student cohort consisted of 22 students across 5 pathways.

from The Funeral Parlour On the Hill

from The Funeral Parlour On the Hill

from The Funeral Parlour On the Hill

from The Funeral Parlour On the Hill

from The Funeral Parlour On the Hill

THIS METHOD HELPS IN PROVIDING MORE LAND AREA FOR THE EDGE AND HENCE IF DONE STRATEGICALLY, IT WILL PROVIDE OPPORTUNITY FOR INFRASTRUCTURE. AN EXAMPLE OF THIS BEING USED ARE THE ARTIFICIAL PALM ISLANDS OF DUBAI . IN GLASGOW’S CONTEXT WE OBSERVE THE WIDTH OF THE RIVER KEEPS CHANGING FROM 80M @ GLASGOW GREEN TO 135 M AT CUSTOM QUAY. TO CHANNELIZE IT TO A CONSTANT OF 80M WILL HELP AQUIRE MORE LAND AND AN WAY TO MAKE IT FLOOD RESILIENT. TO MAKE THE WATER TIDES MORE STABLE WE SHIFT THE WEIR FROM GLASGOW GREEN TO JUST WEST OF KINGSTON BRIDGE AND HENCE THE WATER LEVEL RISING UP TO THE EDGE FABRIC.

from Habitable Clyde Edge

The flooding conditions here as depicted as pre and post-flood where the rooms that are used for activities embracing the river, get flooded in the future and offered back to the river for it to expand on and flow.

from Habitable Clyde Edge

As Glasgow has always been in the SHIPBUILDING industry we see through these images that the bank earlier was used to have these ‘shed-like structures which were used for goods storage and were accessible through both sides. These ran parallel to the river and had widths ranging from 10m wide to 25 m. We can also see that the proportions of the buildings around Clyde were of human scale ( ranging from ground to + 3 floors ) which added to the picturesque town in age. This forms the base for what is being proposed as a habitable wall infrastructure ahead.

from Habitable Clyde Edge

Continuing the pool intervention, the next step was to create flood-able spaces of the future which will be used currently and be part of the place-making goal of this project. Hence the creation of ‘rooms’ which sit ‘3.5 m to 4 m below the upper edge and provide an opportunity for the public to approach the river more physically and visually. A similar example of this can be seen in the ‘Chicago River Walk’ where different rooms open up to the river with different activities for the public to engage in. Each of these rooms has a unique identity responding to the context of “2 urban blocks” of the river. For example, the ‘cafe room ‘ (the room with all the cafes and restaurants) sits right outside of the IFSC district as it will receive people at different times of the day and night.

from Habitable Clyde Edge

As seen from the rooms theory, we can see the connectivity of the new Clyde bank improves, for pedestrians and vehicles. With 3 new bridges, the increased pedestrian movement across the river is being addressed and better north-south connectivity with the new streets of St. Enoch center. The streets have more place-making opportunities with new build spaces having frontages towards the city directly. A clearly laid out cycle route can be seen on the North bank with continuous movement from east to west.

from Habitable Clyde Edge